Support Site for The Unemployed & Underemployed
Sunday October 26th 2014

Say NO to a 6.9-million Singapore! What Singaporeans can do to save their jobs from foreign talents

 

Design No 1

Since stepping off the Scoot plane three weeks ago, I have being frantically catching up with readers who have emailed me while I was still in Sydney visiting my family.

I must thanked them for waiting patiently as some of them have emailed me at least two months ago and wanted to speak with me about their jobless situation.

However, after meeting up with them, my heart sunk as the same old complaint cropped up frequently -  our local executives  are been replaced by foreigners at the work place.

I met up with John a few days ago – my second appointment with him after seeing him for the first time  about four months ago in June.

John was a classic case of a highly educated local PMET who was caught out by the lax foreign talent policy here.

Earning close to $11,000 just five months ago, he came and saw me the second time at my office a few days ago and during this time  he appeared desperate and frail.

He is married, have a young child and in his early forties. His boyish good looks could have charm a few girls’ hearts if he is still single.

It was fortunate that he managed to  pay up his house mortgage several years ago and do not have to worry about having a roof over his family’s head when he is still jobless.

I was nevertheless aghast how four months of unemployment could do to the confidence and esteem of a highly  educated PMET.

When I saw him for the first time  four months ago at my office, he appeared calm and composed and we  could even laughed and joked during the session.

He was just retrenched and armed with a severance package, he has some financial back-up as he went about to look for a job.

The second appointment was a disturbing and cold one – a chilling sign that unemployment has bit hard into the psyche of one of our brightest and fittest.

Educated in the best local university here and burnt through the meritocratic furnance of our system, John is now reduced to a mixed bag of uncertainty and disappointment – betrayed by the very ones who told us that they will take care of the people  if we excel in our stringent educational system and be diligent in our work.

During the second session, we remained silent occasionally for a full twenty awkward seconds as I do not want to interrupt his train of thoughts as he tried to come to terms with his emotions. 

I always find that our male jobless professionals are rather stoic in how they respond to their jobless circumstances compared to our women counterparts who tend to be abit more emotional and fiery.

John was a risk manager for all of his career life so far – a skill he told me is still very niche and in high demand.

He is also the headhunter’s favourite darling as their high pay package means that the commission reward is also very lucrative.

Most risk managers are  paid handsomely – between $8000 to $10, 000 on average less bonuses.

However,  due to the lax foreign talent policy, many risk managers from the US and Australia have recently came over and John was squeezed out of the lucrative career.

Someone from the HQ in Japan came and replaced him five months ago and he left the Japanese bank with some severance pakcage and a worried look.

 Though he has went for some interviews, he couldn’t land any offer yet as most of his interview competitors were from overseas – US, Australia and Europe.

As his interviewers are also foreigners, John felt that there may be some bias here.

“I couldn’t speak as well as those foreigners and this probably is my biggest handicap during an interview,” John lamented to me  in one of his rare show of displeasure at his jobless situation.

John is also one of the rare few PMETs whom  I have met who only reproached himself for his unemployment situation and I have never hear him blame anyone for his plight – not even the easy-target government.

Mild-mannered and rather shy in his demeanour, John will definitely lose out to a more vocal foreigner from the US or Australia during a job interview – who are known to have the gift of the gab.

For us to compete in the global job market, Singaporeans must learn to speak better English and express themselves more at the work place.

Trained to be followers from young and patted on the head approvingly by both teachers and parents for not speaking out against authorities, Singaporeans tend to lose out alot when it comes to verbal articulation.

I have spoken to many Aussies while staying in Sydney the past few years and found them to be fluent in their spoken language as its their native language.

Even the uneducated road sweeper spoke better English than me!

I told John  maybe he can consider  joining a tostmaster programme as they teach us how to speak properly  in front of a audience.

However, after meeting up with John and a few other professionals who were squeexed out of the global job market by foreign talents here, I must add that there is little protection from the system to ensure that the local professionals have a place in our own country.

Its like you have a plot of land to till and for a long time you could grow potatoes and wheat without fear that you will go hungry – so long you work hard to till the land and fertilise the ground.

You realise later that your village chief decides to let in more people from other villages to share your plot of land and you could do little to protect yourself and family from being squeezed out of your own plot.

Now, you have less potatoes to harvest as the plot of land is being shared by many other strangers let in by the village chief and they all also have to eat.

You try to be kind-hearted and let them have some space to grow their potatoes but soon you realise that the whole plot is being taken over by strangers  leaving you hungry and angry.

The worse is you can’t do anything about the loss of land and potatoes as that means you are  branded as unwelcoming and xenophobic by your village chief who have always ask you to love and accept them.

You begin to look at other villages to move to as you need to survive and take care of your own family members.

This is a simple analogy of what is happening to us at the work place now.

To make matters worse, just the other evening, I was told that a local employer whom I have some contact with, decided to hire a foreigner over one of my jobless referral – over cost matter.

Naturally, my local jobless client was devastated and inconsolable when I told her about  the bad news.

Nevertheless, the crucial question remains: What can Singaporeans do to save their jobs from being snatched away by foreign talents?

Our Prime Minister has warned us that he will be gunning for a 6.9-million population  by 2030 – even though the  majority of Singaporeans are against the idea.

How many local Singaporeans will lose their jobs then in order to please our government’s wish?

You can’t let in 800, 000 more foreigners without providing them with good jobs and housing facilities.

Moreover, is a 6-million-population the ultimate wish of our own  citizens?

The next few years will be tough for Singaporeans as they have to stay on top to retain their jobs or else they will be replaced by 800, 000 more foreigners flooding the tiny red dot looking for work.

Lets hope that our government can come to their senses and stop the country from sinking into chaos and oblivion.

Written by: Gilbert Goh 

Reader Feedback

9 Responses to “Say NO to a 6.9-million Singapore! What Singaporeans can do to save their jobs from foreign talents”

  1. jj@39 says:

    No wonder S’pore is always chosen to be a popular country to work & live by the foreigners in surveys published in Yahoo, lianhezaobao, straits times & magazines.

    When the FT, PAP, richs were enjoying themselves here, ordinary S’poreans suffered. When jobless ordinary folks asked for finance assistance from govt, they told you don’t always depend on govt. You have to solve your own problems.

  2. xiaopipi says:

    Why the village chief wants to let more people into the same plot of land is very simple.

    Cos if the plot of land is only used by you, the villager can only collect rent from just you one person.

    However, if the same plot of land is rented to a few more other people, the village chief maximize the use of the land, he can a lot more rent from the extra people.

    So thats why your village chief keep on advertising to other people, please come here and plant on our land. He even provides the seeds and water for free for those who come over.

    The more people who come in to plant, the more rent he collects.

    Oh, you? The village chief dont have to bother about you, because the land is owned by him what …

    So what if you or your dad have ploughed the land before this?

    It was ME, the village chief who asked you to plough the land. So the land is fertile now because of my outstanding leadership. All the credit belongs to me. Therefore I shall reward myself with a million sack of potatoes every year.

    But whenever our tenancy agreement is going to expire, I purposely decrease the rent a little bit and give you a sack of potatoes to tempt you to sign the next tenancy agreement.

    Then once you signed it, I will increase the rent higher to cover back and I will constantly remind you that it is because of my wonderful leadership of getting you and your dad to plough the land, thats why you got a place to grow your potatoes. And in future, all your sons will need to plough the land for me too.

    Whenever you ask me for more potatoes, I always make it a point to tell you I had given a sack of potatoes early this year. I never bother whether a sack opotatoes can last you for one week or ten months. All I know is that I have given you a sack of potatoes, I did my part to help you.

    You cannot depend me on this village chief for help. You need to grow your potatoes yourself.

    This entire thing is the whole story about Singapore, dont you agree?

    • David says:

      F the ‘village chief’ & his party! Hope their Kama will come soon before the local villagers die of hunger & suffering!

  3. xiaopipi says:

    Why the village chief wants to let more people into the same plot of land is very simple.

    Cos if the plot of land is only used by you, the villager can only collect rent from just you one person.

    However, if the same plot of land is rented to a few more other people, the village chief maximize the use of the land, he can a lot more rent from the extra people.

    So thats why your village chief keep on advertising to other people, please come here and plant on our land. He even provides the seeds and water for free for those who come over.

    The more people who come in to plant, the more rent he collects.

    Oh, you? The village chief dont have to bother about you, because the land is owned by him what …

    So what if you or your dad have ploughed the land before this?

    It was ME, the village chief who asked you to plough the land. So the land is fertile now because of my outstanding leadership. All the credit belongs to me. Therefore I shall reward myself with a million sack of potatoes every year.

    But whenever our tenancy agreement is going to expire, I purposely decrease the rent a little bit and give you a sack of potatoes to tempt you to sign the next tenancy agreement.

    Then once you signed it, I will increase the rent higher to cover back and I will constantly remind you that it is because of my wonderful leadership of getting you and your dad to plough the land, thats why you got a place to grow your potatoes. And in future, all your sons will need to plough the land for me too.

    Whenever you ask me for more potatoes, I always make it a point to tell you I had given a sack of potatoes early this year. I never bother whether a sack of potatoes can last you for one week or ten months. All I know is that I have given you a sack of potatoes, I did my part to help you.

    You cannot depend me on this village chief for help. You need to grow your potatoes yourself.

    This entire thing is the whole story about Singapore, dont you agree?

  4. Anon says:

    At the end of the day, who did the risk manager vote for?? Most banksters I know will only vote for PAP. They want the mass import of foreigners to continue, to continue supporting the red-hot property market, as well as having an ever expanding pool of customers for deposits, transactions, loans, credit cards, remittance services, insurance, selling of funds and other BS financial services. What many of you don’t realise is that the relatively good economy and high salaries being bandied around in S’pore today is as a result of the hot property market, which spills over into the financial industry and other supporting industries. It is no secret that many big established companies and businessmen are speculating and “investing” in real estate to boost their profits, even though their main industry is totally different e.g. retail, newspapers, healthcare / hospitals, supermarkets, F&B, public transportation, etc.

    So if the risk manager has been voting for PAP all this while (which I suspect so), then he only has himself to blame, for not hedging sustainability & personal risks but instead to maximise his own profits. It’s a 2-edged sword — it cuts both ways.

  5. Elfred says:

    Btw this village chief used to collaborate with the Japanese during WWII, many wondered if he has anything to do with the deaths of tens of thousands of Chinese and Malays.

    After that, he fled to Britain, did his studies and collaborate with the British. What a cowardly fox.

  6. Elfred says:

    Did he collaborate with the then Communists too ?

  7. Elfred says:

    Not to mention the other ‘founders’ of Singapore who he imprisoned.

  8. Renee says:

    There is obviously a bundle to realize about this. I
    assume you made some good points in features also.

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