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Monday January 21st 2019

Can’t Find A Job In Singapore? Try Dubai (ezinearticles.com)

http://ezinearticles.com/?Work-in-Dubai&id=29625

Dubai is home to an exciting, diverse, multi-cultural blend of young, dynamic and professional people all enjoying the unrivalled quality of life the Emirate has to offer. It is of absolutely no surprise therefore that Dubai has the fastest growing population in the world.

More and more people emigrate to the city for quality of life, outstanding employment prospects and to experience the very best in the world of work and lifestyle.

One of the most immediate and attractive aspects of working in Dubai is that fact that there are no personal taxes levied against income from employment. This is not as an incentive to attract foreign investment; it is long established fact and policy because direct taxation is against the traditions of the entire United Arab Emirates. This means that if you work in Dubai you will enjoy and benefit from your entire salary, you will have considerably more disposable income than you are used to, you will be able to enjoy the benefits of the offshore financial world and you will be able to afford a lifestyle that others can only dream of.

Many expatriate forums on the internet feature similar threads where those considering taking up an offer of employment in Dubai ask whether life really is as good as it looks and as good as the media portrays it in the Emirate, and time and again, without fail the answers will come back from expatriates who have already made Dubai home that ‘yes, life really is as good as it gets!’

Booming industries in Dubai include telecommunications, information technology, construction, engineering, oil & gas, media and medicine and they all afford their employees significant disposable income. However, if you want to get the most out of your time in Dubai financially speaking you might like to consider the financial services industry.

Those who reside in Dubai are in a position to take complete advantage of all the offshore investment world has to offer them to make their hard earned tax-free income go even further. But they require the advice and on-going services of independent financial brokerages; therefore the wealth of opportunity available to good financial advisers is outstanding. As a result, the limited number of independent financial adviser positions available in the financial services industry in Dubai are highly prized.

For a financial brokerage to legitimately operate within the Emirate they have to be strictly licensed, this places a direct restriction on the number of brokerages who can operate there. Naturally enough this places a restriction on the number of adviser positions there are, but as stated the opportunities for an adviser are fantastic and the job is one worth aiming for if you consider yourself to be a dynamic sales-person, determined and driven by hard work, results and rewards.

When asked what to expect from working life in Dubai, there is no way to generalise. Working hours vary from industry to industry but are never exploitative, pay scales also vary depending on the nature of the job with manual work and lower ranking employment opportunities actually paying well because of the nature of the work involved. High ranking jobs and industries attract significant salaries as well as attractive benefits for staff. Issues relating to holiday entitlement, employee rights, overtime pay, sick and maternity leave are all well regulated, documented and strictly enforced meaning that the employee is generally very well looked after.

If you work in Dubai you are likely to enjoy an excellent working environment with modern, futuristically equipped spacious and comfortable office spaces, many dining opportunities and excellent transportation the norm across the city. After hours the expatriate can enjoy the shopping, nightlife, sports, recreational facilities, tours & excursions, outdoor activities and water sports Dubai is equally famous for.

Families relocating to the city will find rental accommodation fairly easy to secure and always of incredible quality, and since Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoom the crown prince of Dubai granted foreign property ownership rights back in 2002 those who are enjoying substantial tax free incomes can now buy their very own piece of the Emirate. Property in Dubai is not only currently widely available, of incredible quality and style but it is also an excellent commodity in investment terms with prices increasing significantly year on year and supply limited by the physical geographic restrictions of the city.

If you have children and would like them to be education in one of the many schools in the city, securing places can be tricky but not impossible. The educational standards are most definitely better than in most other schools worldwide, just as the medical facilities available in Dubai are some of the best in the world as well.

If you’re considering Dubai for your next assignment what’s stopping you taking the plunge?

Rhiannon Williamson writes about living, working, investing and buying property abroad on her site http://www.ShelterOffshore.com – and if you’re specifically looking for work and jobs in Dubai, the living in Dubai section of the site will be useful to you.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Rhiannon_Williamson

Rhiannon Williamson - EzineArticles Expert Author

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http://www.shelteroffshore.com/index.php/living/more/moving-to-live-in-dubai-what-to-expect-10014

In this article we’ll explore what newly arrived expats living in Dubai can expect – covering both the good and the bad aspects of the emirate!

The Good Things About Living in Dubai

1) Dubai is an exciting and happening destination that cannot be ignored!  It is therefore the place to be if you want to enjoy your social life and your working life in the fast lane.

2) The climate in the emirate for 8 months of the year is perfect.  Long hot days dominated by cloudless blue skies and enhanced with beautiful warm seawaters.

3) The social side of life is fantastic and diverse.  Many expats join a hotel or private beach club when they arrive and spend much of their down time enjoying the facilities.  For others there are more sports and sports clubs closely concentrated together within the emirate than anywhere else in the world!  In the evenings the social side of life moves on to bars, clubs and restaurants with Dubai playing host to as wide a range of tastes as is probably possible!

4) The educational standards in Dubai are excellent and new schools and colleges are being constructed almost annually.

5) Every major international corporation has a base in Dubai – or so it seems!  This means that there are opportunities aplenty.

6) Income is tax free!

7) One can repatriate funds easily – therefore you can earn a fantastic salary in Dubai and send some of it home as well.

8) The emirate is increasingly accessible with its major international airport welcoming flights from across the world.

9) The shopping in Dubai is fantastic!

10) The standard of living is very high.

11) Crime is very low.

12) Dubai is a very tolerant emirate – tolerant of others’ beliefs and ways of life.  It is also one of the most moderate in terms of applying the rules of Islam to everyone’s every day life.  Therefore for example, expats are able to buy alcohol in Dubai and also they are allowed to eat and drink during the daylight hours of Ramadan.

13) Taxis are very cheap and the government is investing hugely into a public transportation system.

14) Cars and petrol are very cheap indeed!

15) It’s usual practice for families to have domestic help.
The Bad Things About Living in Dubai

1) Dubai is a bit of a bureaucratic headache especially for newly arrived expatriates who have to have licenses and permits for everything!  You need a permit to buy alcohol, a license to drive, a permit to work and a permit to reside in Dubai of course!  Get advice and assistance supplied and agreed up front from your employer to ease this initial period of adjustment that can actually put some people off staying in the emirate!

2) Unmarried couples are not allowed to live together – it’s actually the law.

3) The summer months from June to September are almost unbearably hot and many expats take holiday time off during this period to return home.  It can make it worse if you have children as for most of the day they will really need to stay indoors in air-conditioned rooms.

4) The traffic situation in Dubai is untenable.  It is so bad, so dangerous and so frustrating that it has a daily impact on the lives of those who have to commute or take children to school etc.  Okay, so the gridlock should be eased by the government’s program of investment into public transport systems, but these systems will not be in place for a few years.  In the meantime, taking a drive in Dubai is taking your life in your hands.

5) Public toilets are an unpleasant shock for Western expats.

6) Housing and schooling is incredibly expensive in Dubai.

7) The cost of living in Dubai is on a par with living in central London – i.e., it is VERY expensive!

8) Expat workers from non-Western or affluent backgrounds suffer some exploitation.

9) There is a certain amount of governmental censorship on films, access to websites and even the likes of SKYPE.  Some expats find this restrictive and frustrating.

10) Working hours can be very long and international companies operating in Dubai in particular do tend to expect an awful lot from their expatriate employees – possibly because the salaries are higher and improved by lack of tax they feel they have some sort of ownership of their employees? 

11) Dubai is currently a building site!  There are pockets of calm and oases of tranquillity across the emirate, but there is also frenetic and relentless development occurring which can make life a little tiring and stressful at times.

12) Inflation is massive in Dubai, fuelled by property and rental prices in particular.

13) Dubai is not exactly an environmentally friendly place nor is it the sort of place to live if you want to take long walks in quiet places!

14) If you arrive in Dubai on a flight in the late evening expect long, long queues at immigration!

15) Rent is due one year in advance and upfront.

Some Tips for Expats Moving to Dubai

1) Negotiate a good package with your employer that allows you money for housing and schooling.

2) Agree that your company will assist you with the transition to living in Dubai, giving you practical help and the time off needed to get all your licenses and permits in place!

3) Take about 30 passport-sized pictures of each member of the family with you and multiple copies of identification documents as you need them for everything.

4) Plan holidays away from Dubai during the intense heat of the summer sunshine.

5) Remember that there is a policy of ZERO TOLERANCE on drink driving.  You may well be caught, if caught you will go to prison.  Take a taxi.

6) During Ramadan you will be able to eat and drink during daylight hours, but in specially designated areas of your workplace or a restaurant.  Be respectful and mindful of the Muslim traditions.

7) Women, think about what you wear.  Whilst you do not have to cover yourself from head to toe, if you wear anything slightly revealing you will be stared at simply because you are an oddity!  Consider wearing trousers or long skirts as well as tops that cover your shoulders and do not reveal too much cleavage!

8) You’ll have to have post delivered to you at work or get a post office box.

9) Learn some Arabic.

10) Ramadan takes place during the ninth month of the Muslim calendar which is a lunar calendar meaning that the Holy Month moves forward by 12 days each year.

11) You should register with either your embassy or consulate in Dubai.

12) Get your children’s names down early with your preferred schools.

13) If you take medicines or drugs regularly, check that you can bring them in to Dubai legally.  Many drugs that we commonly used are illegal in Dubai and could result in you being imprisoned for drug trafficking if you attempt to enter the emirate with them.

14) Leave ALL non-essential prescription or over the counter drugs at home – it’s safer.

15) Take extra care on the roads, insist all members of the family buckle up at all times and try and keep your cool when all around you others are getting frustrated!

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